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Assessment and Intervention

  • Emmanuel Janagan Johnson
  • Camille L. Huggins
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Social Work book series (BRIEFSSOWO)

Abstract

In this chapter, it is an introduction of the assessment, intervention and termination processes as part of the casework process. It will provide an overview of three assessment, intervention and termination processes to work with clients with differing concerns such as; a behavior modification. Then a review of the task centered model which is a brief psychological casework method that is efficient to help individuals and families with problems in the family relations. Another assessment framework is a problem-solving framework which is used to diagnose problems and help clients is a problem-solving framework which is a cognitive activity aimed at changing a problem to a goal.

Keywords

Assessment Intervention Behavior theory Task-cantered approach Problem-solving approach Evaluation Termination 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emmanuel Janagan Johnson
    • 1
  • Camille L. Huggins
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Behavioural Sciences St. Augustine CampusThe University of the West IndiesSt. AugustineTrinidad and Tobago

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