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The Unique Environment of the Caribbean

  • Emmanuel Janagan Johnson
  • Camille L. Huggins
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Social Work book series (BRIEFSSOWO)

Abstract

The Caribbean consists of multiple islands with unique histories and a large diaspora of people from various races, ethnicities and religions. The purpose of this chapter is to explain the complicated environment of the Caribbean and the importance of the casework method to the region as a form of anti-oppressive practice.

Keywords

Caribbean Anti-oppressive practice Races Ethnicities 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emmanuel Janagan Johnson
    • 1
  • Camille L. Huggins
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Behavioural Sciences St. Augustine CampusThe University of the West IndiesSt. AugustineTrinidad and Tobago

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