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The Reaction: Chemical Affinity: Laws, Theories and Models

  • Kevin C. de BergEmail author
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Molecular Science book series (BRIEFSMOLECULAR)

Abstract

According to Quílez (Found Chem, 2018, [1]) the idea of affinity as the disposition of two chemical species to react goes back to the work of the theologian and natural philosopher Albertus Magnus during the 13th century.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Avondale College of Higher EducationCooranbongAustralia

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