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The Reaction: Chemical Affinity and Controversy

  • Kevin C. de BergEmail author
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Molecular Science book series (BRIEFSMOLECULAR)

Abstract

In 1855, the nature of a chemical reaction was still being hotly debated amongst chemists. They drew upon the concept of ‘chemical affinity’ to explain why substance A might react with substance B, but not substance C, in that A had a stronger affinity for B, than it did for C, or was more strongly attracted to B than to C.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Avondale College of Higher EducationCooranbongAustralia

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