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On Revolution in Lutheran Political Ethics

  • Carl-Henric GrenholmEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Radical Theologies and Philosophies book series (RADT)

Abstract

Revolutions are always a result of human revolt against different forms of injustice and oppression, and they presuppose that a fundamental change of existing political and economic structures is possible. The purpose of this chapter is to examine the resistance to revolution and the support of political authorities within Lutheran ethics. A main thesis is that a revision of traditional Lutheran political theology is necessary in order to make possible a critique of prevailing political and economic structures. The doctrine of the two kingdoms should be abandoned and political ethics should be related not only to the doctrine of creation but also to Christology and eschatology. Lutheran ethics can learn from liberation theology and ecumenical social ethics that liberation presupposes an ongoing revision of social orders. From an eschatological perspective, no existing social system is perfectly just, and therefore we should always strive for a permanent revolution.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Uppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden

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