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Dynamic Modelling

Chapter
Part of the Springer Texts in Business and Economics book series (STBE)

Abstract

In this chapter we extend economic modelling to include the time dimension. Dynamic modelling is the essence of macroeconomic theory. Our discussions provide the basic ingredients of the so-called dynamic general equilibrium model.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kam Yu
    • 1
  1. 1.Lakehead UniversityThunder BayCanada

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