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Archaeology at First Government House, Sydney

  • Tim Murray
  • Penny Crook
Chapter
Part of the Contributions To Global Historical Archaeology book series (CGHA)

Abstract

In this chapter we review of previous research and an outline of our methodology which has underwritten a new account of the archaeology of Sydney’s First Government House (FGH), a site of great national and international significance. Following a discussion of the formation processes and sequence of construction at FGH, we provide two studies of different aspects of its archaeology: first, the tablewares and dining equipage of Governors King and Macquarie, and, second, the unusual architectural history of the guard house, built c.1812 and partially demolished in 1838.

Keywords

Sydney Urban archaeology Heritage Reinterpretation of archaeological records 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tim Murray
    • 1
  • Penny Crook
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Arts, Social Sciences and CommerceLa Trobe UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Archaeology and HistoryLa Trobe UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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