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Bee Stings and Beer: The Significance of Food in Alabamian POW Newspapers

  • Christine Rinne
Chapter

Abstract

Christine Rinne’s chapter “Bee Stings and Beer: the Significance of Food in Alabamian POW Newspapers” explores the function of food in two newspapers written by German soldiers held during the end of the Second World War, Der Zaungast and POW-Oase. These POWs enjoyed abundant food while held in the USA, unlike during fighting or when initially captured. Rinne argues that the descriptions of food cultivation, preparation and consumption, in both fiction and non-fiction pieces, serve to reinforce a connection to the homeland through shared imagery and traditions; establish distinctions between themselves and their captors based on perceptions of artificiality and superficiality; express the soldiers’ fears about uncertain cultural changes during their absence; and forge a moral universe to guide them on their way home.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christine Rinne
    • 1
  1. 1.University of South AlabamaMobileUSA

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