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The Battle of Stalingrad, September–November 1942

  • Stephen Walsh
Chapter

Abstract

The chapter will analyse what the Germans and Soviets hoped to achieve at the strategic, operational, and tactical levels. It will emphasise that the Germans found themselves in a truly distinctive fighting environment, one to which they struggled, despite brilliant martial skills, to adapt. It will stress that the Red Army was not a passive cast member in a German drama played out on a Russian stage, but a ruthlessly innovative opponent prepared to engage in a terrible struggle to the death in a unique fighting environment that gave it a better chance of success. In short, the Red Army at Stalingrad proved itself a more formidable opponent than the German Army had so far encountered during World War II.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Walsh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of War StudiesRoyal Military Academy SandhurstCamberleyUK

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