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Advancing the Right to Demonstrate in Kenya Through Negotiated Management

  • Mariam Kamunyu
  • Edward Kahuthia Murimi
Chapter

Abstract

Kenya is a State Party to international and regional legal instruments that guarantee the right to demonstrate and this right is equally enshrined in the Constitution of Kenya, 2010. The reality, however, for those who seek to exercise this right has been that they are oftentimes met with excessive use of force by the police. The result has been that demonstrators have been maimed and even lost their lives, particularly in demonstrations held in periods before and after elections as was the case in 2007, 2013 and 2017. Kenya’s current legislative framework, this chapter argues, has adopted an approach where demonstrations are tolerated as opposed to being facilitated, with very little or no tolerance to disruption of public life. It demonstrates that the policing approach to demonstrations in Kenya has followed the escalated force model characterised by, inter alia, use of force to disperse demonstrators, including use of physical punishment.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mariam Kamunyu
    • 1
  • Edward Kahuthia Murimi
    • 2
  1. 1.Centre for Human Rights, University of PretoriaPretoriaSouth Africa
  2. 2.University of NairobiNairobiKenya

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