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“Ruins True Refuge”: Beckett and Pinter

  • David Tucker
Chapter

Abstract

This essay uses a combination of archival material and textual analysis to explore how Harold Pinter managed to take Samuel Beckett’s fragmentary texts, his self-reflexive dead ends and entropic permutations, into new lineages of literary creativity. Taking a lead from the notion of the ruin, the essay uses the history of so-called language scepticism to argue for commonalities between the two writers in order to show how various ways in which things might be “ruined,” that is physically, psychologically and primarily linguistically, can provide a useful lens through which we might track some of the ways in which Pinter took Beckett’s work into new realms.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Tucker
    • 1
  1. 1.Goldsmiths, University of LondonLondonUK

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