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Different Animals of Westermarck and Durkheim

  • Salla Tuomivaara
Chapter
Part of the The Palgrave Macmillan Animal Ethics Series book series (PMAES)

Abstract

This chapter traces the sources Westermarck and Durkheim use for their ideas on animals—where their knowledge on animals and their characteristics and behaviour comes from. Their sources of knowledge also affect the language they use when they discuss animals. The chapter moves on to analyse the language Westermarck and Durkheim use when describing animals. Westermarck is more interested in the zoological enquiries of his time and his language creates more individual representations of animals than Durkheim’s choices. Westermarck’s use of Darwin is extensive, whereas Durkheim relies mainly on other sources, especially Spencer, when discussing evolutionary ideas.

Keywords

Representations of animals Charles Darwin Herbert Spencer Eileen Crist Zoology Evolution Language 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Salla Tuomivaara
    • 1
  1. 1.HelsinkiFinland

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