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Designing Quantitative Research Studies

  • Karen Mangold
  • Mark Adler
Chapter

Abstract

There are variety of quantitative research designs that are amenable to use in educational scholarship. The design complexity will depend on available resources and the question(s) being investigated. A simulation-based medical education (SBME) quantitative study can range from an observational study to a complex, multiple group effort with or without randomization. Ensuring adequate number of participants are enrolled to have sufficient power to detect important differences is key; most educational research is underpowered. Certain designs (e.g., mastery learning) have grown in use.

Keywords

Experimental and quasi-experimental design Study design Randomization Translational research 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen Mangold
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mark Adler
    • 1
  1. 1.Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics (Emergency Medicine) and Medical EducationNorthwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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