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Customers’ Assessments of Retail Traditional Local Markets: Strategy Outcome Performance Screening

  • Jaesuk Jung
  • Eunju KoEmail author
  • Arch G. Woodside
Chapter

Abstract

This study assesses customers’ assessments of place sustainability and place attractiveness of a large-scale traditional local market (TLM). The study proposes a general theory of antecedents and outcomes for customer assessments of place sustainability and place attractiveness for one category of TLM: a collection of many independent shops (e.g., 1000 to 10,000+ shops) available contiguously in one geographic area (i.e., a long-period market)—spanning generations of shop-keeping family stores, large in scale and scope, and selling a wide range of products of very substantial varieties, with many shops marketing to ultimate consumers, retailers, or a mix of retailers and consumers. Rather than using the currently dominant theory and research logic of proposing and testing symmetrical directional hypothesis (i.e., increasing X associates with increases in Y) and the reporting of net effects of independent variables, the study reports generalizable asymmetric case-based models of TLM sustainability and attractiveness. Case-based modeling proposes that certain screening rules of antecedent conditions enable identifying cases having certain outcomes consistently (e.g., frequent visits and high expenditure outcomes). The study includes findings from a survey of customers (n = 162) of their assessments of place sustainability and place attractiveness of Seomun (“West Gate”) Market, a large TLM in Daegu City, Republic of Korea. The findings support the general conclusions that TLM place sustainability and place attractiveness models associate with shoppers having high rates of visiting and expenditures consistently as well as additional models indicating that certain place sustainability and attractiveness models associate with cases having infrequent visits and low expenditures.

Keywords

Case Local markets Traditional Place attractiveness Place sustainability Shoppers 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Yonsei UniversityCollege of Human EcologySeoulRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Yonsei University, Yonsei Frontier LabSeoulRepublic of Korea

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