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Nature-Driven Urbanism

  • Rob RoggemaEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the Contemporary Urban Design Thinking book series (CUDT)

Abstract

The city is nature. In many ways this bold statement can be contested, but at the same time wildlife is so abundant Rotterdam is called a wilderness park (Reumer, Wildpark Rotterdam. De stad als natuurgebied. Historische Uitgeverij, Groningen, 2014). One can discuss whether this is true or not, but more interesting is to see the city as a piece of nature, and as such undertake the actions to develop it further. In a city nature should not be treated as something worth to preserve, after all such unique nature can hardly be found inside urban contexts, rather something to increase, enrich and make more resilient.

Keywords

Nature Urban ecology Urban nature Nature-driven Nature-based solutions 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research Centre for the Built Environment NoorderRuimteHanze University of Applied SciencesGroningenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Citta IdealeOffice for Adaptive PlanningWageningenThe Netherlands

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