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Management of Anoxic Brain Injury

  • Maximilian Mulder
  • Romergryko G. Geocadin
Chapter
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Abstract

Anoxic brain injury is a heterogeneous clinical entity encompassing a spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from brain death and minimally conscious states, to recovery of consciousness with cognitive impairment and movement disorders, to mild transient loss of consciousness with or without transient neurologic deficits. This clinical diagnosis is made after loss of consciousness following global cerebral hypoxia or hypoperfusion. No radiologic, laboratory or electrophysiologic test can diagnose this condition in isolation. Targeted temperature management and meticulous supportive care are the mainstays of treatment, which have been demonstrated to improve clinical outcomes. The literature surrounding extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support and neuroprognostication is rapidly evolving. This chapter describes current evidence based approaches and areas of controversy in this area.

Keywords

Hypoxic-ischemic injury TTM Cardiac arrest Neurologic prognostication Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy Post-resuscitation care Therapeutic hypothermia Multi-modality prognostication 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maximilian Mulder
    • 1
  • Romergryko G. Geocadin
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Critical CareAbbott Northwestern HospitalMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.Anesthesiology-Critical Care, Neurosurgery, and Joint Appointment in Medicine, Attending Neuro-Intensivist, Division of Neurosciences Critical CareJohns Hopkins Encephalitis Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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