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Revisiting Greenspeak

  • Peter MühlhäuslerEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Theory and History in the Human and Social Sciences book series (THHSS)

Abstract

The book Greenspeak (1998) sought to establish the foundations of a critical discourse concerned with the ways the environmental crisis has been constructed by a range of environmental discourses, both by environmentalists and non-environmentalist and anti-environmentalist speakers, as distinct from an environmental advocacy document. The distinction made between scientific and moral discourses and meta-discourses has become increasingly blurred in recent times, a process helped by the emergence of social media as a powerful source of shaping human perceptions and actions. Revisiting Greenspeak I shall argue that this proliferation of ideological rather than empirically grounded green discourses has greatly reduced their efficacy.

Keywords

Greenspeak Environmental discourse Ecolinguistics 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Supernumerary FellowLinacre CollegeOxfordUK
  2. 2.University of AdelaideAdelaideAustralia

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