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Social Justice and Students with Intellectual Disability: Inclusive Higher Education Practices

  • Michelle L. BonatiEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

University lecturers hold the power to act in socially just or unjust ways that define who belongs at university. In this chapter, Bonati creates an awareness of how people with intellectual disability are excluded from universities, and how professors and lecturers can transform their teaching practices to welcome all students with diverse abilities and backgrounds. The chapter examines how students with intellectual disability challenge perceptions of the ‘ideal’ university student and prompts readers to reflect on their biases and teaching practices. It concludes with recommendations for removing unnecessary barriers in the learning environment by incorporating inclusive pedagogy in order to support students with intellectual disability to be among the diverse spectrum of learners within the university community.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.State University of New YorkPlattsburghUSA

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