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A Textual Analysis of Chinese Netizens’ Reactions to Counter-Terrorism Reports on The People’s Daily from 2010 to 2017

Chapter

Abstract

Studies show that compared to their American counterparts, Chinese authorities and media have less interest in global terrorist groups. Instead, the Chinese government uses global counter-terrorism as an ideology to strike on Muslim separates in Xinjiang, an autonomy bordering Afghanistan where the majority of residents are Uywur. It has taken years for the Chinese government to finally relate global counter-terrorism efforts to its domestic counter-separatism strategies. On December 27, 2015, the 18th Session of the Standing Committee of the 12th National People’s Congress passed the Anti-Terrorism Law of the People’s Republic of China. Major western media outlets such as Reuters, Washington Post, and New York Times immediately covered the news, and many critics feared that China was “overreacting” and called the law “controversial.” This paper analyzes The People’s Daily’s coverage on counter-terrorism events and reporting and how the netizens of “A Prosperous Nation Forum” react to it. The implications of China’s media coverage and audience responses to global counter-terrorism and domestic terrorism are suggested.

Keywords

Counter-terrorism Anti-terrorism law of the People’s Republic of China Netizens The People’s Daily “A Prosperous Nation” forum Xinjiang 

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Further Reading

  1. Cheng, J. Y. S. (2006). Broadening the Concept of Security in East and Southeast Asia: The Impact of the Asian Financial Crisis and the September 11 Incident. Journal of Contemporary China, 15(46), 89–111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Richard, A. (2015). From Terrorism to ‘Radicalization’ to ‘Extremism’: Counterterrorism Imperative or Loss of Focus? International Affairs, 91(2), 371–380.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Rubio, M., & Smith, C. (2015). Freedom of Expression in China: A Privilege Not a Right. Congressional-Executive Commission on China. Retrieved from http://www.cecc.gov/freedom-of-expression-in-china-a-privilege-not-a-right.
  4. Wayne, M. I. (2009). Inside China’s War on Terrorism. Journal of Contemporary China, 18(59), 249–261.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wei Sun
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Communication, Culture and Media StudiesHoward UniversityWashingtonUSA

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