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A Holistic Approach to Educating Children in Care: Caring Schools

  • Claire CameronEmail author
  • Katie Quy
  • Katie Hollingworth
Chapter
Part of the Children’s Well-Being: Indicators and Research book series (CHIR, volume 22)

Abstract

The educational attainment gap that children in care usually have at the start of their school career often stays with them through primary school. Research suggests that whole school, inclusive approaches where high aspirations are also in place are most likely to successfully address the needs of children in care. This chapter describes part of a project in England where the concept of Caring Schools was developed, with four domains: ethos and leadership, child focused practice, relationships with parents and carers, and interagency working. The aim is to set out what might be considered benchmark indicators of good practice in a holistic approach.

Keywords

Out-of-home-care Primary-school Inclusive Holistic Caring schools 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to the Virtual School, the staff and children in the schools, foster carers, social workers and other participants in the research. This study was funded by the local authority and the Department for Education but the views expressed are the authors’ own.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Thomas Coram Research UnitUCL Institute of EducationLondonUK

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