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A. V. Dicey

  • Nadia E. Nedzel
  • Nicholas Capaldi
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Classical Liberalism book series (PASTCL)

Abstract

The first serious explication of the concept of the ‘rule of law’ is in A. V. Dicey’s The Law of the Constitution. Dicey explained how the ‘rule of law’ arose from judicial decisions within private law, and this was a fundamental difference from the Continental legal tradition. As noted in his later publication, Lectures on the Relation Between Law and Public Opinion in England During the Nineteenth Century, the explanation and defense of the ‘rule of law’ was motivated by the growing danger from Benthamism (Enlightenment Project) and subsequent administrative or public law. This is followed by a defense of Dicey on the part of both Leoni and Hayek and concludes with the identification and rebuttal of Dicey’s critics, Loughlin, and Allison.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nadia E. Nedzel
    • 1
  • Nicholas Capaldi
    • 2
  1. 1.Southern University Law CenterBaton RougeUSA
  2. 2.College of BusinessLoyola University New OrleansNew OrleansUSA

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