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Fiduciary Discretion

  • R. Eljalill Tauschinsky
Chapter

Abstract

Fiduciary theory offers a framework for constructing authority, including the limits of its legitimacy and its accountability, without having to rely on either national law theories or representative mechanisms. This chapter explain what fiduciary law is and how it can be applied to the Commission adopting delegated and implementing acts. This chapter also give a first overview over the consequences of finding the Commission to be a fiduciary of the persons subject to its rule-making.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Eljalill Tauschinsky
    • 1
  1. 1.WalldorfGermany

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