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Introduction to Fire Debris Analysis

  • Jamie Baerncopf
  • Sherrie Thomas
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter serves as an introduction to the fire debris analysis discipline. It covers a wide range of topics including an introduction to fire investigation, analysis of fire debris evidence, classification of ignitable liquids, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry data interpretation, other fire debris examinations, and report writing. Though this chapter cannot cover every aspect of fire debris analysis in details, it should provide a great foundation and starting point for students and examiners working in this discipline.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jamie Baerncopf
    • 1
  • Sherrie Thomas
    • 2
  1. 1.Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives- Forensic Science LaboratoryWalnut CreekUSA
  2. 2.Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives- Forensic Science LaboratoryAtlantaUSA

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