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From Atoms to Humans: Chemical Shift and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  • Rob HerberEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Springer Biographies book series (SPRINGERBIOGS)

Abstract

In his NMR experiments in 1939, Ramsey found six different peaks instead of the expected single peak for molecular hydrogen (H2) and deuterium (D2).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Utrecht UniversityUtrechtThe Netherlands

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