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The Potential of a Future 3 ‘Capabilities’ Curriculum

  • Richard Bustin
Chapter

Abstract

The Capabilities approach to whole school curriculum thinking is explored through the use of a model. Subjects are at the heart of this model, with the powerful disciplinary knowledge of subjects forming the basis of the knowledge-based capabilities that young people will develop through their time in schools; these capabilities then enable young people to make informed choices in life about how to live. GeoCapabilities relates this to the powerful knowledge of geography, investing the subject with its educational potential. Critiques of powerful knowledge and GeoCapabilities question the usefulness of the concept and the challenge of a subject-based curriculum. To be enabled a Future 3 ‘capabilities’ curriculum needs a powerful knowledge-led subject-based curriculum; a curricular focus on outcomes not outputs; a focus on curriculum as well as pedagogy; a coherent curriculum; a subject specialist in front of every class and the treating of teachers as professionals.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Bustin
    • 1
  1. 1.Worcester ParkUK

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