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Qualitative Career Assessment: A Higher Profile in the Twenty-First Century?

  • Mary McMahonEmail author
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Abstract

Career assessment, including qualitative career assessment, has a long history in career development. To date, qualitative career assessment has a much more limited profile in career counselling than its quantitative counterpart which has amassed an abundance of psychometric career assessment instruments and research. In practice, both forms of assessment may be used to complement each other. Qualitative career assessment is theoretically consistent with narrative career counselling which has proliferated in the twenty-first century and is therefore well positioned to assume a higher profile. However, a higher profile has not eventuated and qualitative career assessment, despite its strengths and advantages, remains beset with a number of challenges including a lack of definitional clarity and a limited evidence base. This chapter overviews qualitative assessment in career counselling and begins by considering what exactly qualitative career assessment is. Subsequently it discusses assessment in career counselling and provides a brief history of qualitative career assessment. Following this, the chapter overviews the use and development of qualitative career assessment, and briefly describes some common instruments. A discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of qualitative career assessment and the challenges it faces concludes the chapter.

Keywords

Qualitative career assessment Career assessment Qualitative assessment Narrative career counselling 

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The University of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia

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