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International Career Assessment Using the Occupational Information Network (O*NET)

  • Alexis HannaEmail author
  • Christina Gregory
  • Phil M. Lewis
  • James Rounds
Chapter
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Abstract

The Occupational Information Network (O*NET) is a premier source of occupational information. O*NET is an open–source online platform that contains data for almost all occupations in the United States. These data are continually collected, disseminated, and updated. O*NET data and products are used for many purposes, from research to career development to public policy. Recently, international users have begun to develop similar platforms based on O*NET’s model for their own countries. O*NET supports several possibilities for international career assessment and cross cultural research. This chapter provides an overview of the history and structure of O*NET, as well as the O*NET products and database available for use. The chapter then details career assessment examples and opportunities both within the United States and internationally. Lastly, this chapter outlines challenges and considerations in using O*NET internationally and potential outlets and possibilities for international career assessment with O*NET in the future.

Keywords

Occupational information network O*NET International career assessment Crosscultural research 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexis Hanna
    • 1
    Email author
  • Christina Gregory
    • 2
  • Phil M. Lewis
    • 3
  • James Rounds
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Illinois, Urbana-ChampaignChampaignUSA
  2. 2.North Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA
  3. 3.National Center for O*NET DevelopmentAlexandriaUSA

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