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The Radical Right in Europe: Variations of a Socio-political Phenomenon

  • Klaus Wahl
Chapter

Abstract

In recent years, radical right parties and movements in Europe have been increasingly successful. They exploit and nourish a broad resistance to immigrants as well as Islamophobia. In some countries, governments were formed with or at least supported by radical right parties. This chapter presents empirical findings on radical right ideologies, attitudes, discourses, parties, movements, actions, and electoral success in Western, Central, and Eastern Europe.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Klaus Wahl
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychosocial Analyses and Prevention - Information System (PAPIS)MunichGermany

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