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Language Contact and Competition in Latin America

  • Danae PerezEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Minority Languages and Communities book series (PSMLC)

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the debates on, and approaches to, societal language contact with a particular focus on bilingual societies and diasporic communities. It begins with outlining diglossic societies to show that the principal factors that determine language competition are usually extralinguistic in nature. The case of Paraguay is particularly interesting, since here the colonial language, Spanish, is spoken alongside an indigenous one by the majority of the population. The second part centers on English and other immigrant languages in Latin America, above all English-speaking enclaves as well as the role of English as a foreign language. This will show that English in Latin America is often the door—or the barrier—to social upward mobility. The last part considers the contribution of New Australia, and that its originally ideological foundation as a utopian community equals many characteristics of diaspora communities.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of ZurichZürichSwitzerland

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