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Disabled People in Development: What Future?

  • Lara Bezzina
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Disability and International Development book series (PSDID)

Abstract

This concluding chapter reviews the concepts emerging throughout the book and their implications in the field of disability and development. It also explores the potential of participatory research, informed by postcolonial theory and working together with disabled people, in challenging their long-standing oppression. The first section of the chapter summarises the main ideas presented in the preceding chapters. The second one then reviews the implications of the findings in relation to the significance of postcolonial approaches to disability. In the third section, the implications of these concepts are reviewed in relation to the practice and politics of development in Burkina Faso, in other sub-Saharan African countries and in the wider Global South contexts. The concluding section reflects on potential pathways for future research and practice in the field of disability and development, and why these matter.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lara Bezzina
    • 1
  1. 1.Independent ResearcherMostaMalta

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