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A Call for Reflexivity: Implications of the Internationalisation Agenda for Arts Management Programmes Within Higher Education

  • Victoria DurrerEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Sociology of the Arts book series (SOA)

Abstract

This chapter argues for greater investigation of the implications the internationalisation agenda within higher education may have on the education and practice of arts management. Very little critical examination of programme development, curriculum design, and teaching and learning practices, which have emerged alongside or even resulted from internationalisation, exist. The article reviews what we currently know about the field of education. It begins with an exploration of the rationale for, and the processes of, its emergence and the implications of its international growth with a particular focus on the UK. The article raises ethical concerns for arts management educators working within this increasingly internationalised context. It concludes by suggesting ways to facilitate greater reflexivity in teaching and learning practice as well as to enhance greater study of the processes and implications of the internationalisation of arts and cultural management education.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Queen’s University BelfastBelfastUK

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