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Culture and International Development: Managing Participatory Voices and Value Chains in the Arts

  • J. P. SinghEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Sociology of the Arts book series (SOA)

Abstract

The cultural turn in international development can be traced back to the 1980s. Critiques from social scientist and the rise of participatory development practices have now brought culture to the fore of development. This essay analyses two important aspects of the culture and international development: (1) notions of human well-being that are fundamental to both involving people in development efforts and in thinking of how they may participate in improving their lives, (2) cultural expressions require sustainable cultural infrastructures that allow for cultural creation, production, distribution, archiving—the value chain of cultural expressions. The essay is divided into three parts: (1) a survey of the literature on culture and development, (2) human well-being and culture, and (3) a cultural infrastructure and value chain perspective with empirical examples. The review is interdisciplinary drawing from anthropology, cultural studies, economics, post-colonial history and literatures, international relations, political science, and sociology.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.George Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA

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