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The Transtextual Road Trip: Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Supernatural, and Televisual Forebears

  • Stephanie A. Graves
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, Graves considers the lasting cultural influence of Joss Whedon’s Buffy the Vampire Slayer through the lens of textual genealogy, tracing contemporary intertextual and metatextual references to the show that situate BtVS as an enduring parent text. In particular, the chapter focuses on the close genealogical ties between BtVS and the long-running Supernatural, which strongly features not only a generic debt and a narrative structure that is directly influenced by BtVS, but also contains both a deep intertext with and myriad references to the Buffyverse. Additionally, an exploration of Supernatural’s extra- and paradiegetic expansions clearly situates Supernatural as a direct paratextual and transmedial analogue to Whedon’s show, further illustrating BtVS’s lasting significance.

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© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephanie A. Graves
    • 1
  1. 1.Georgia State UniversityAtlantaGeorgia

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