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Brain on Art Therapy-Understanding the Connections Between Facilitated Visual Self-expression, Health, and Well-Being

  • Girija KaimalEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series on Bio- and Neurosystems book series (SSBN, volume 10)

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of processes and outcomes of art therapy using both personal experiences and professional examples of art-making. Along with acknowledging scholarship on the purpose and impacts of visual art-making, the focus of this chapter is specifically on the components of art therapy, including art-making, the art product, the patient/client, and the art therapist and how we might approach research by integrating findings from imaging technologies and neurobiological approaches.

Keywords

Art therapy Neuroscience Visual expression Art-making 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Creative Arts Therapies DepartmentDrexel UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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