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Inferring Positive Selection in Large Viral Datasets

  • Hugo López-Fernández
  • Pedro Duque
  • Noé Vázquez
  • Florentino Fdez-Riverola
  • Miguel Reboiro-Jato
  • Cristina P. Vieira
  • Jorge VieiraEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 1005)

Abstract

A large amount of viral nucleotide sequences is available in databases that can be used to identify positively selected amino acid sites, and thus make inferences on which sites are important for immune system escape and adaptation to their host. Nevertheless, the software pipelines needed to analyse such large datasets usually imply long running times. Moreover, their power to identify positively selected amino acid sites may not be similar. Therefore, here we first analyse, under a variety of conditions, the performance of different software applications and then propose a protocol for the analysis of large datasets.

Keywords

Viruses Positively selected amino acid sites Big data 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This article is a result of the project Norte-01-0145-FEDER-000008 - Porto Neurosciences and Neurologic Disease Research Initiative at I3S, supported by Norte Portugal Regional Operational Programme (NORTE 2020), under the PORTUGAL 2020 Partnership Agreement, through the European Regional Development Fund (FEDER). The SING group thanks the CITI (Centro de Investigación, Transferencia e Innovación) from the University of Vigo for hosting its IT infrastructure. This work was partially supported by the Consellería de Educación, Universidades e Formación Profesional (Xunta de Galicia) under the scope of the strategic funding ED431C2018/55-GRC Competitive Reference Group. H. López-Fernández is supported by a post-doctoral fellowship from Xunta de Galicia (ED481B 2016/068-0).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hugo López-Fernández
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Pedro Duque
    • 1
    • 2
  • Noé Vázquez
    • 3
  • Florentino Fdez-Riverola
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Miguel Reboiro-Jato
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Cristina P. Vieira
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jorge Vieira
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde (I3S)Universidade do PortoPortoPortugal
  2. 2.Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular (IBMC)PortoPortugal
  3. 3.ESEI, Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of VigoOurenseSpain
  4. 4.The Biomedical Research Centre (CINBIO)VigoSpain
  5. 5.SING Research GroupGalicia Sur Health Research Institute (ISS Galicia Sur), SERGAS-UVIGOVigoSpain

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