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Managing Policies in EMEMUS

  • Emma DafouzEmail author
  • Ute Smit
Chapter

Abstract

With the use of the ROAD-MAPPING framework, this chapter examines managerial and policy concerns in English-medium Education in Multilingual University Settings (EMEMUS). In order to do this, three cases are examined in detail focusing on three different hierarchical levels—namely institutional (at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid), national (in the case of Japan, Bradford & Brown, 2018a) and continental (the Erasmus+ project titled EQUiiP). While clearly different in their approach of managerial issues, all three examples show how our framework can be used to inform higher education policy and practice, as well as teacher professional development without losing sight of language issues.

Keywords

EMEMUS management University policy Applying ROAD-MAPPING framework Teacher professional development 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of English StudiesComplutense University of MadridMadridSpain
  2. 2.Department of English StudiesUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria

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