Advertisement

Researching EMEMUS

  • Emma DafouzEmail author
  • Ute Smit
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter illustrates the research potential of the ROAD-MAPPING framework as it argues for possibilities of using the framework for investigations into English-medium Education in Multilingual University Settings (EMEMUS). By way of exemplification, two research focal points are foregrounded: participant expectations and evaluations of relevant educational practices, on the one hand, and, on the other, English-medium classroom discourse. For these two investigative areas, four finished studies (Baker & Hüttner in Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 38(6): 501–516, 2016; Dafouz, Hüttner, & Smit in Conceptualising integration in CLIL and multilingual education. Multilingual Matters, Bristol, UK, pp. 123–143, 2016; Komori-Glatz in English as a business lingua franca in multicultural student teamwork: An EMEMUS study (PhD thesis). University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria, 2017; Smit, 2010b) are introduced that showcase different ways of how the framework has informed the phases of conceptualisation, study design and methodology, data analysis and/or interpretation of findings. By extension, we argue that these examples illustrate that investigations into EMEMUS benefit from working with the ROAD-MAPPING framework.

Keywords

EMEMUS research Applying ROAD-MAPPING framework Teacher beliefs Student beliefs Classroom discourse 

References

  1. Baker, W., & Hüttner, J. (2016). English and more: A multisite study of roles and conceptualisations of language in English medium multilingual universities from Europe to Asia. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 38(6), 501–516.  https://doi.org/10.1080/01434632.2016.1207183.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Barcelos, A. M. F. (2003). Researching beliefs about SLA: A critical review. In P. Kalaja & A. M. F. Barcelos (Eds.), Beliefs about SLA: New approaches (pp. 7–33). New York, NY: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Björkman, B. (2013). English as an academic lingua franca: An investigation of form and communicative effectiveness. Boston, MA: De Gruyter.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Borg, S. (2011). The impact of in-service teacher education on language teachers’ beliefs. System, 39(3), 370–380.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2011.07.009.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bradford, A., & Brown, H. (Eds.). (2018). English-medium instruction in Japanese higher education: Policy, challenges and outcomes. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
  6. Buehl, M., & Beck, J. S. (Eds.). (2015). International handbook of research on teachers’ beliefs. Abingdon, UK: Routledge.Google Scholar
  7. Dafouz, E. (2011). English as the medium of instruction in Spanish contexts: A look at teacher discourses. In Y. Ruiz de Zarobe, J. M. Sierra, & F. Gallardo de Puerto (Eds.), Content and foreign language integrated learning norms and practices in genre contributions to multilingualism in European contexts (pp. 189–210). Bern, Switzerland: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  8. Dafouz, E., Hüttner, J., & Smit, U. (2016). University teachers’ beliefs of language and content integration in English-medium education in multilingual settings. In T. Nikula, E. Dafouz, P. Moore, & U. Smit (Eds.), Conceptualising integration in CLIL and multilingual education (pp. 123–143). Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Deterding, D. (2013). Misunderstandings in English as a lingua franca: An analysis of ELF interactions in South-East Asia. Retrieved from https://www.degruyter.com/view/books/9783110288599/9783110288599/9783110288599.xml.
  10. Doiz, A., Lasagabaster, D., & Sierra, J. M. (Eds.). (2013). English medium instruction at universities: Global challenges. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
  11. Dorfsman, M. I. (2018). The development of discourse in the online environment: Between technology and multiculturalism. International Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education, 15(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s41239-018-0110-5.
  12. Gray, J., & Morton, T. (2018). Social interaction and English language teacher identity. Edinburgh, Scotland: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Hynninen, N. (2016). Language regulation in English as a lingua franca: Focus on academic spoken discourse. Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Jenkins, J. (2014). English as a lingua franca in the international university: The politics of academic English language policy. Abingdon, UK: Routledge.Google Scholar
  15. Komori-Glatz, M. (2017). English as a business lingua franca in multicultural student teamwork: An EMEMUS study (PhD thesis). University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.Google Scholar
  16. Komori-Glatz, M. (2018). Conceptualising English as a business lingua franca. European Journal of International Management, 12(1/2), 46.  https://doi.org/10.1504/EJIM.2018.089043.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Kuckartz, U. (2014). Qualitative text analysis: A guide to methods, practice and using software. London, UK: Sage.Google Scholar
  18. Kuteeva, M. (2019). Researching English-medium instruction at Swedish universities: Developments over the past decade. In K. Murata (Ed.), English-medium instruction from an English as a lingua franca perspective (pp. 46–63). Abingdon, UK: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Lanvers, U., & Hultgren, A. K. (2018a). The Englishization of European education: Concluding remarks. European Journal of Language Policy, 10(1), 147–152. https://doi.org/10.3828/ejlp.2018.7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Lanvers, U., & Hultgren, A. K. (2018b). The Englishization of European education: Foreword. European Journal of Language Policy, 10(1), 1–11. https://doi.org/10.3828/ejlp.2018.1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Ledergerber, A. (2015). Teaching business presentation skills: A heuristic case study. In R. Wilkinson & M. L. Walsh (Eds.), Integrating content and language in higher education: From theory to practice—Selected papers from the 2013 ICLHE conference (pp. 223–238). Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  22. Mauranen, A. (2012). Exploring ELF: Academic English shaped by non-native speakers. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Mautner, G. (2016). Discourse and management. London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Mercer, N. (2004). Sociocultural discourse analysis: Analysing classroom talk as a social mode of thinking. Journal of Applied Linguistics, 1(2), 137–168.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Miles, M. B., Huberman, A. M., & Saldaña, J. (2014). Qualitative data analysis: A methods sourcebook. London, UK: Sage.Google Scholar
  26. Mortensen, J. (2014). Language policy from below: Language choice in student project groups in a multilingual university setting. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 35(4), 425–442.  https://doi.org/10.1080/01434632.2013.874438.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Murata, K. (Ed.). (2019). English-medium instruction from an English as a lingua franca perspective: Exploring the higher education context. Abingdon, UK: Routledge.Google Scholar
  28. Pajares, M. F. (1992). Teachers’ beliefs and educational research: Cleaning up a messy construct. Review of Educational Research, 62(3), 307–332.  https://doi.org/10.3102/00346543062003307.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Salas, E., Sims, D. E., & Burke, C. S. (2005). Is there a “big five” in teamwork? Small Group Research, 36(5), 555–599. https://doi.org/10.1177/1046496405277134.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Seidlhofer, B. (2011). Understanding English as a lingua franca. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  31. Smit, U. (2010a). CLIL in an English as a lingua franca (ELF) classroom: On explaining terms and expressions interactively. In C. Dalton-Puffer, T. Nikula, & U. Smit (Eds.), Language use and language learning in CLIL classrooms (pp. 259–277). Amsterdam, The Netherlands: John Benjamins.Google Scholar
  32. Smit, U. (2010b). English as a lingua franca in higher education: A longitudinal study of classroom discourse. Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter.Google Scholar
  33. Smit, U. (2014). English-medium education in multilingual university settings: A sociolinguistic examination of interactive explaining in the classroom. ILC Lecture presented at the Centre for Language Education and Acquisition Research, University of Southampton. Retrieved from http://blog.soton.ac.uk/ilc/files/2014/05/Smit_ILClecture_19_02_14_slides.pdf.
  34. Smit, U., & Dafouz, E. (2012). Integrating content and language in higher education: An introduction to English-medium policies, conceptual issues and research practices across Europe. In U. Smit & E. Dafouz (Eds.), Integrating content and language in higher education: Gaining insights into English-medium instruction at European universities—AILA Review (pp. 1–12). Amsterdam, The Netherlands: John Benjamins.Google Scholar
  35. Stahl, G. K., Maznevski, M. L., Voigt, A., & Jonsen, K. (2010). Unraveling the effects of cultural diversity in teams: A meta-analysis of research on multicultural work groups. Journal of International Business Studies, 41(4), 690–709.  https://doi.org/10.1057/jibs.2009.85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Valcke, J., & Wilkinson, R. (Eds.). (2017). Integrating content and language in higher education: Perspectives on professional practice. Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  37. Walsh, S. (2011). Exploring classroom discourse: Language in action. Abingdon, UK: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of practice: Learning, meaning, and identity. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Wenger, E., McDermott, R. A., & Snyder, W. (2002). Cultivating communities of practice: A guide to managing knowledge. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of English StudiesComplutense University of MadridMadridSpain
  2. 2.Department of English StudiesUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria

Personalised recommendations