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The ROAD-MAPPING Framework

  • Emma DafouzEmail author
  • Ute Smit
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter offers an updated account of ROAD-MAPPING, our conceptual framework developed to examine English-Medium Education in Multilingual University Settings (EMEMUS) (originally introduced in Dafouz and Smit (Towards a dynamic conceptual framework for English-medium education in multilingual university settings. Applied Linguistics, 37(3), 397–415, 2016). Informed by recent developments in various research areas, such as the internationalisation of higher education, multilingual education, sociolinguistics, ecolinguistics, language policy research and discourse studies, the framework consists of six intersecting, yet independent dimensions, which are accessible through the discourses of EMEMUS: Roles of English, Academic Disciplines (language) Management, Agents, Practices and Processes, Internationalisation and Glocalisation. Foregrounding their multi-layered nature, each of the dimensions is described and elaborated in detail, supported by a range of illustrations from various EMEMUS cases. To capture the essence of our dimensions, working definitions are provided in the final section.

Keywords

Internationalisation of higher education ROAD-MAPPING framework Conceptualisation Sociolinguistics Ecolinguistics Language policy Discourse 

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© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of English StudiesComplutense University of MadridMadridSpain
  2. 2.Department of English StudiesUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria

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