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Implementing Universal and Targeted Mental Health Promotion Interventions in Schools

  • Aleisha M. ClarkeEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Evidence-based school interventions aimed at enhancing children’s and young people’s mental health and well-being, when implemented effectively, are associated with multiple positive social, emotional, behavioural and academic outcomes. In this chapter, we examine a range of approaches to implementing mental health promotion in schools including universal classroom skill-based interventions, targeted interventions for anxiety and depression, suicide prevention interventions and digital interventions. A number of case studies are presented that illustrate innovative evidence-based approaches, highlighting the challenges of implementing programmes within the local context, and identifying the key factors that contribute to embedding programmes within the education curriculum and supporting their scale-up.

Keywords

Schools School-based interventions Children Young people Universal interventions Targeted interventions Classroom-based interventions Social and emotional skills Suicide prevention interventions Online interventions Digital interventions 

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Child Mental Health & WellbeingEarly Intervention FoundationLondonUK

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