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Use of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

  • Vladislav Volarevic
  • Bojana Simovic Markovic
  • C. Randall Harrell
  • Crissy Fellabaum
  • Nemanja Jovicic
  • Valentin Djonov
  • Nebojsa Arsenijevic
Chapter
Part of the Stem Cells in Clinical Applications book series (SCCA)

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract that are characterized by phases of exacerbation and remission. Currently available therapeutics are unable to completely invert inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract of IBD patients. Accordingly, novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of IBD are urgently needed.

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are self-renewable, multipotent cells capable to suppress immune response and to differentiate into gastrointestinal epithelial cells. MSC-mediated suppression of intestinal inflammation and, at the same time, MSC-dependent regeneration of gut epithelium were responsible for their beneficial effects in the therapy of IBD patients. As demonstrated by several already completed clinical trials, local transplantation of MSCs is safe and efficient approach for the healing of perianal fistulas while systemic administration of MSCs may result in either attenuation or aggravation of IBDs. In this chapter we emphasize current knowledge and future perspectives related to the use of MSCs in the therapy of IBDs.

Keywords

Inflammatory bowel diseases Crohn’s disease Ulcerative colitis Mesenchymal stem cells Therapy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vladislav Volarevic
    • 1
  • Bojana Simovic Markovic
    • 1
  • C. Randall Harrell
    • 2
  • Crissy Fellabaum
    • 2
  • Nemanja Jovicic
    • 1
  • Valentin Djonov
    • 3
  • Nebojsa Arsenijevic
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Molecular Medicine and Stem Cell Research, Faculty of Medical SciencesUniversity of KragujevacKragujevacSerbia
  2. 2.Regenerative Processing Plant-RPP, LLCPalm HarborUSA
  3. 3.Institute of AnatomyUniversity of BernBernSwitzerland

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