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A Primer on Cades Cove

  • Gary S. FosterEmail author
  • William E. Lovekamp
Chapter
  • 34 Downloads

Abstract

The ecology of Cades Cove, a geophysical feature in the Great Smoky Mountains of the Appalachian Mountain range, offered a temperate climate and an abundance of diverse, natural resources, including water, flora, and fauna that accommodated human occupation as early as 10,000 years ago. Human habitation continued throughout the prehistoric period, and the geography was subsequently occupied by Euro-American settlers beginning in the early 1800s. They occupied the land for more than 100 years, establishing the mountain community of Cades Cove until it was taken by the federal government for the creation of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in the 1930s. Many of the edifices were razed to present a National Park Service interpretation of a nineteenth-century mountain community that is now visited by 2.4 million people annually.

Keywords

Civil War Fauna Flora Historic settlement Migration Park creation Prehistoric 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sociology, Anthropology, and CriminologyEastern Illinois UniversityCharlestonUSA

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