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Results: EFL Primary School Teachers

  • Gila A. Schauer
Chapter
Part of the English Language Education book series (ELED, volume 18)

Abstract

This chapter addresses a wider range of issues in the field of English language teaching and teaching young learners than the two previous results chapters, which primarily focused on interlanguage pragmatics and TEYL. This approach was taken for two reasons: First, some of the findings from one area may be linked to another and I wanted to obtain (and subsequently provide to readers) a fuller picture of the EFL primary teaching context based on in-service teachers’ survey responses. Secondly, my discussions with teachers had made me aware that although they tended to value the exchange of ideas, materials and views very much, they were not always in a position to engage in conversations with colleagues from other schools and were sometimes wondering about good practice in other places. I hope that by addressing topics from different areas of primary ELT, in-service and pre-service teachers who may not have much opportunity to engage with others may at least be able to get some insights into what their (future) colleagues are doing, thinking about and experiencing in their classrooms.

In the following, I will first analyse and discuss components of a lesson. I will then move on to assessment. This will be followed by a discussion of skills, knowledge and competence areas. Subsequently, I will address how pupils are grouped in classroom activities. This will be followed by a discussion of pragmatic routines. Subsequent to this, I will analyse and discuss rituals at the beginning and end of the lesson. I will then focus on differentiation, followed by special needs issues, and homework. Next, textbooks and other teaching materials will be addressed. This will be followed by a section on children’s books and songs. Finally, a summary of this chapter will be provided.

Keywords

EFL ELT TEFL TEYL Pragmatic routines Classroom rituals Differentiation SEN Greetings Leave-takings 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gila A. Schauer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of LinguisticsUniversity of ErfurtErfurtGermany

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