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Results: Speech Acts in Textbooks

  • Gila A. Schauer
Chapter
Part of the English Language Education book series (ELED, volume 18)

Abstract

In this chapter, I will first examine the total number of different speech acts contained in four textbooks series (Bumblebee, Ginger, Playway, Sunshine), as this will provide some initial indications on which of the textbooks may enable young EFL learners to encounter a variety of different speech acts and thus different pragmatic functions. I will then analyse requests and responses to requests, greetings and leave-takings, expressions of gratitude and responses to expressions of gratitude, apologies, suggestions and responses to suggestions and expressions of physical and mental states. This will be followed by a summary of the findings of this chapter.

Keywords

Textbook analysis EFL textbooks TEYL Requests Greetings Leave-takings Thanking Apologies Responsive speech acts Reactive speech acts 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gila A. Schauer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of LinguisticsUniversity of ErfurtErfurtGermany

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