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Bamboo-Based Technology for Resource Conservation and Management of Gullied Lands in Central India

  • S. Kala
  • A. K. Singh
  • B. K. Rao
  • H. R. Meena
  • I. Rashmi
  • R. K. Singh
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Science, Technology & Innovation book series (ASTI)

Abstract

This vast tract of existing gully lands is posing potential threat to nearby productive lands because of overexploitation and poor management. Situation-specific cost-effective viable technologies for reclamation and productive utilization of gullied lands are highly essential. The study designed and evaluated bamboo-based technology for resource conservation and protective utilization of gullied lands for the analysis of hydrological behaviour, growth and economic analysis. Among three treatments, the growth performance of bamboo plants showed maximum average culm height and culm collar diameter of 11.76 m and 42.11 mm. The average crown size and number of culms per clump were recorded to be 7.27 m and 29.60 numbers, respectively, at Manikpura village watershed. Technology of planting bamboo (D. strictus) with suitable moisture conservation practice proved as a viable alternative on ravines for gully beds stabilization, control sloping land erosion through good soil-binding effect and fast-growing vegetative cover. Hydrological results revealed that runoff was reduced from 9.6 to 1.8% and soil loss from 4.2 to 0.6 t/ha/year in the last 4 years. The economic analysis suggested a cash outflow of Rs. 48,000 ha−1 from seventh year onwards to the stakeholders in the region. The study revealed that cultivation of bamboo in gullied lands of ravine area has the potential for good earning to the resource-poor farmers and improving livelihood.

Keywords

Bamboo Clumps Gully beds Livelihood improvement Resource conservation Soil erosion Runoff Vegetative cover 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Kala
    • 1
  • A. K. Singh
    • 1
  • B. K. Rao
    • 2
  • H. R. Meena
    • 1
  • I. Rashmi
    • 1
  • R. K. Singh
    • 1
  1. 1.ICAR—Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Research CentreKotaIndia
  2. 2.Water and Land Management Training and Research InstituteHyderabadIndia

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