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Radiology Case 7

  • Caitlin Hackett
  • Joshua K. AalbergEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Anterior shoulder dislocations account for 95% of shoulder dislocations. In those cases, the humeral head is displaced anteriorly, inferiorly, and medially. The peak age is 15–25 years, and it is more common in males. The four types of anterior dislocations are subcoracoid, subclavicular, subacromial, and intrathoracic. Posterior shoulder dislocations account for 2–4% of the glenohumeral dislocations. The humeral head usually dislocates straight posteriorly (subacromial). Rarely, the humeral head may dislocate subglenoid or subspinous. The peak age is 35–55 years, and it is more common in males. It can occasionally be bilateral depending on the mechanism.

Keywords

Anterior shoulder dislocations Humeral head Anteriorly Inferiorly Medially 

Notes

Disclosure Statement

The authors of this chapter report no significant disclosures.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Emergency MedicineWexner Medical Center at The Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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