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Aerosol Indirect Effect on Air Pollution-Meteorology Interaction in an Urban Environment

  • Wanmin GongEmail author
  • Ayodeji Akingunola
  • Shuzhan Ren
  • Stephen Beagley
  • Rodrigo Munoz-Alpizar
  • Paul Makar
  • Craig Stroud
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Complexity book series (SPCOM)

Abstract

Using a fully coupled air quality prediction model, simulations were carried out to investigate the impact of aerosol indirect effect on air pollution-meteorology interaction in an urban environment. We found that the aerosol indirect effect results in an increase in cloud droplet number concentration, a reduction in cloud droplet size, and an increase in cloud water. While, as a result, precipitation production is suppressed in low-level clouds, we found that, in a case of deep convective clouds, there is an enhancement of cloud ice and precipitation production at higher levels due to the increase in abundance of smaller drops being carried up in the updraft. There is also an indication of enhanced convective activity due to urban heating.

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Copyright information

© Crown 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wanmin Gong
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ayodeji Akingunola
    • 1
  • Shuzhan Ren
    • 1
  • Stephen Beagley
    • 1
  • Rodrigo Munoz-Alpizar
    • 2
  • Paul Makar
    • 1
  • Craig Stroud
    • 1
  1. 1.Air Quality Research Division, Science and Technology BranchEnvironment and Climate Change CanadaTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Air Quality Modelling and Application, Meteorological Service of CanadaEnvironment and Climate Change CanadaDorvalCanada

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