Advertisement

Automation of Heat Exchanger Shell Holes Machining Operation

  • A. Yu. GorelovaEmail author
  • M. G. Kristal
  • V. A. Martynenko
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering book series (LNME)

Abstract

The design of the shell and tube heat exchanger includes a tubelike shell with holes to which an inlet and outlet pipes are welded. Radial and tangential holes are produced manually by means of plasma cutting with the use of specialized tools, which determines high laboriousness of heat exchanger production. An automatic device is proposed to reduce the laboriousness of this operation. To produce the hole in the heat exchanger shell, two reversible motions are superimposed: linear motion of the cutter along the longitudinal axis of the shell and the shell rotary motion. A mathematical model of the required cutter motion is proposed, which describes the relative trajectories of the plasma cutter and the shell in parametric form. To verify theoretical premises, a prototype of the device was produced using a 3D prototyping technology, a ball screw for the reversible linear motion of the cutter and a stepper motor for the reversible rotary motion of the shell. The shell is fixed by means of a collet chuck and rests on the pipe roller support. The principles of automatic control of the linear and rotary motions of the cutter and the shell are proposed, based on the 3D model of the shell.

Keywords

Holes machining Automatic cutting Plasma cutting Automatic device 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors express their gratitude to A. M. Makarov (Head of the Department of Technological Processes Automation at Volgograd State Technical University) and Ju. M. Bazhensky (Senior Research Assistant at the same department).

References

  1. 1.
    3D Printing Industry (2012) 3D Printing processes: free beginner’s guide 3D printing industry. Available via DIALOG. http://3dprintingindustry.com/3d-printing-basics-free-beginners-guide/processes/. Accessed 10 Nov 2018
  2. 2.
    Baron VG (2018) The heat exchanger. RU Patent 182, 250, 9 Aug 2018Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Baron VG (2018) The heat exchanger. RU Patent 182, 251, 9 Aug 2018Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Baron VG (2018) The heat exchanger. RU Patent 182, 252, 9 Aug 2018Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Bojtler Bit (2014) Laser beam cutting system with variable cutting speed. CH Patent 2, 516, 155, 20 May 2014Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Clark WT, Partington EC (1978) Machining method. US Patent 4098153, 4 July 1978Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Delzenne M, Augeraund R (2000) Oxygen arc cutting with plasma pre-heating of ferrous materials, such as structural steel workpieces. FR Patent WO 00/37207 29 June 2000Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Drobotov A, Avdeev A, Shvets A (2018) Magnetohydrodynamic pump application in complex form aluminum parts additive manufacturing. In MATEC web of conferences international conference on modern trends in manufacturing technologies and equipment 2018 (ICMTME 2018), Sevastopol, Russia, 10-14 Sept 2018, 224:1–6CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Efimov N (1965) Short course of analytic geometry. Nayka, MoscowGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Fridel Jens, Irrgang Gerkhard, Krink Folker, Ollmann Jens (2015) Method of plasma cutting at plasma cutting unit by pulsating electric current. RU Patent 2, 542, 158, 20 February 2015Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Gushin I, Avdeev A, Shvets A, Drobotov A (2015) Principles of creating a program for the 3D printing device operation. Izvestia VSTU. 11:50–53.  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-8788-2_11CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Kovalev OB, Fomin VM (2013) Physical basics of thick sheet materials laser cutting. FIZMATLIT, MoscowGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Laurisch F, Krink V (2018) Method of plasma cutting of workpieces. RU Patent 2, 647, 959, 21 March 2018Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Madeja K, Laurisch F, Rueckert R, Krink V (2007) Device and method for the plasma-cutting of workpieces with an additional fusible electrode guided between the nozzle and the workpiece. DE Patent 102005039070, 22 Feb 2007Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Mokrozub VG, Morozov SV (2013) The Structure of informational and logical model of shell-and-tube heat exchangers. Vestnil TGTU 3:518–525Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Monaenkov IV (2009) Method for automatic control of laser cutting or hole drilling process and device for its realisation. RU Patent 2, 375, 162, 10 June 2009Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Rodin AO, Udakov SV, Strizevsky MN (2016) Bulk cutting machine. RU Patent 166, 992, 27 Sept 2016Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Rudjak EhM, Rudjak EEh (1996) Plasma arc cutting device. RU Patent 9, 510, 23, 66, 20 Nov 1996Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Tverskoj VS, Tverskoj AV (2006) Method for treatment of surfaces. RU Patent 2, 286, 866, 10 Nov 2006Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Yakof KSA, Zabudin NF, Sahat IM, Adib MAHM (2018) Development of 3D printed heart model for medical training. In: Hassan M. (ed) Intelligent manufacturing & mechatronics. Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering, pp 109–116Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Yu. Gorelova
    • 1
    Email author
  • M. G. Kristal
    • 1
  • V. A. Martynenko
    • 1
  1. 1.Volgograd State Technical UniversityVolgogradRussia

Personalised recommendations