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Insights into the Development of Light Microscopes

  • Barry R. MastersEmail author
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Part of the Springer Series in Optical Sciences book series (SSOS, volume 227)

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to highlight some critical insights that I have obtained from my decades-long perusal of English and German literature on the history of optical microscopes and my visits to American and European museums that contain extensive collections of microscopes.

References

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Further Reading

  1. Beck, R. (1865). A Treatise on the Construction, Proper Use, and Capabilities of Smith, Beck, and Beck’s Achromatic Microscopes. London: John van Voorst, Paternoster Row. A Facsimile Edition is published by, Lincolnwood, Illinois: Science Heritage Ltd.Google Scholar
  2. Bracegirdle, B. (1986). A History of Microtechnique, The evolution of the microtome and the development of tissue preparation. Second Edition. Lincolnwood, IL: Science Heritage Ltd.Google Scholar
  3. Cajal, S. R. (1989). Recollections of my life. Santiago Ramón y Cajal. Translated by E. Horne Craigie with Juan Cano. Cambridge: The MIT Press.Google Scholar
  4. Deiman, J. C. (1991). A myth revealed: The case of the ‘Beeldsnyder achromatic objective’. Annals of Science, 48, 577–581.Google Scholar
  5. Gloede, W. (1986). Vom Lesestein zum Elektronenmikroskop. Berlin: VEB Verlag Technik.Google Scholar
  6. Martin, L. C. (1966). The Theory of the Microscope. New York: American Elsevier Publishing Company.Google Scholar
  7. McGucken, W. (1969). Nineteenth-Century Spectroscopy, Development of the Understanding of Spectra 1802–1897. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press.Google Scholar
  8. Rooseboom, M. (1940). Die holländischen Optiker Jan und Harmanus van Deijl und ihre Mikroskope. Janus, 44, 185–197.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Previously, Visiting Scientist Department of Biological EngineeringMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Previously, Visiting Scholar Department of the History of ScienceHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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