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Aberrations and Artifacts Confound Optical Resolution

  • Barry R. MastersEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the Springer Series in Optical Sciences book series (SSOS, volume 227)

Abstract

In this chapter I encourage critical thinking, a skeptical approach to data, and continuous questioning, which are the key characteristics of a scientist. From the early history of microscopes people questioned the validity of observations and warned about artifacts (Baker, 1769). Are the extremely small objects that are observed with a microscope artifacts?

References

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Further Reading

  1. Gu, M. (2000). Advanced Optical Imaging Theory. Berlin: Springer.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Previously, Visiting Scientist Department of Biological EngineeringMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Previously, Visiting Scholar Department of the History of ScienceHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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