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Potential Technologies for Climate Resilient Agriculture in the Indian Himalayan Region

  • Latika Pandey
  • Ayyanadar Arunachalam
Chapter

Abstract

The Himalaya govern the climatic regime of the entire South-Asian countries where the constituent ecosystems are ecologically vulnerable. Changing climate conditions have impacted the weather events and have further increased the frequency and intensity of various kinds of climatic disasters, all affecting the Himalayan ecology and livelihood security. Nonetheless, the region is rich in natural resources and provides ample opportunities to enhance the quality of lifestyle of the farmers by utilizing the locally available resources along with the introduction of some important modern tools and technologies. The Task Force on Himalayan Agriculture under the National Mission for Sustaining the Himalayan Ecosystem (NMSHE) is playing a crucial role in strengthening the capacities of farmers through appropriate interventions from lab-to-land, so as to enable to the agriculture, a sustainable source of livelihood vis-à-vis climate resilience.

Keywords

Climate resilience Agriculture Indian Himalayan region 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank the Department of Science & Technology, Govt. of India for supporting this study through Task Force on Himalayan Agriculture under the National Mission for Sustaining the Himalayan Ecosystem.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Latika Pandey
    • 1
  • Ayyanadar Arunachalam
    • 1
  1. 1.Task Force on Himalayan Agriculture, Indian Council of Agricultural Research, Krishi BhawanNew DelhiIndia

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